The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) is the agency of the European Union (EU) that provides independent scientific advice and communicates on existing and emerging risks associated with the food chain. EFSA was established in February 2002, is based in Parma, Italy and had a budget for 2008 of €65.9 million.

The work of EFSA covers all matters with a direct or indirect impact on food and feed safety, including animal health and welfare, plant protection and plant health and nutrition. EFSA supports the European Commission, the European Parliament and EU member states in taking effective and timely risk management decisions that ensure the protection of the healthof European consumers and the safety of the food and feed chain. EFSA also communicates to the public in an open and transparent way on all matters within its remit.

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Published on: 9 March 2020

The EFSA Panel on Plant Health performed a pest categorisation of Liriomyza sativae (Diptera: Agromyzidae) for the EU. L. sativae (the cabbage or vegetable leaf miner; EPPO code: LIRISA) is a polyphagous pest native to the Americas which has spread to Africa, Asia and Oceania. L. sativae can have multiple overlapping generations per year. Eggs are inserted in the leaves of host plants. Three larval instars, which feed internally on field vegetables (leaves and stems), follow. Then, the larva jumps into the soil where a fourth larval instar occurs immediately before pupation, which takes place in the soil. L. sativae is regulated in the EU by Commission Implementing Regulation (EU) 2019/2072 (Annex IIA). Within this Regulation, import of soil or growing medium as such or attached to plants for planting from third countries other than Switzerland is regulated. Therefore, entry of L. sativae pupae is prevented. However, immature stages on plants for planting (excluding seeds) and fresh leafy hosts for consumption, cut branches, flowers and fruit with foliage provide potential pathways for entry into the EU. L. sativae has been repeatedly intercepted in the EU, especially in basil (Ocimum spp.). Climatic conditions and the wide availability of host plants provide conditions to support establishment in the EU, both in open fields and greenhouses. Impacts on field vegetables and ornamentals as well as hosts in greenhouses would be possible. Phytosanitary measures are available to reduce the likelihood of entry. L. sativae satisfies the criteria that are within the remit of EFSA to assess for it to be regarded as a potential Union quarantine pest. Although human‐assisted movement of vegetables is considered the main spread way for L. sativae, this agromyzid does not meet the criterion of occurring in the EU for it to be regarded as a potential Union regulated non‐quarantine pest.


© European Food Safety Authority, 2015

Pest categorisation of Liriomyza sativae


Published on: 9 March 2020

The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) carried out a public consultation to receive input from interested parties on the draft risk assessment of aflatoxins in food. This draft scientific opinion was prepared by the EFSA Panel on Contaminants in the Food Chain (CONTAM Panel), supported by the Working Group on Aflatoxins in food.The draft opinion was endorsed by the CONTAM Panel for public consultation on 25 September 2019. The written public consultation was open from 4 October 2019 until15 November 2019. EFSA received comments from 14 different interested parties. EFSA and its CONTAM Panel wish to thank all stakeholders for their contributions. The present report contains the comments received and explains the way they have been considered for finalisation of the opinion. The opinion was adopted at the CONTAM Plenary meeting on 30 January 2020 and published in the EFSA Journal.

This publication is linked to the following EFSA Journal article:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.2903/j.efsa.2020.6040/full


© European Food Safety Authority, 2015

Outcome of a public consultation on the draft risk assessment of aflatoxins in food


Published on: 9 March 2020

The European Commission asked EFSA for a scientific opinion on the risks for animal and human health related to the presence of chlorinated paraffins in feed and food. The data for experimental animals were reviewed and the CONTAM Panel identified the liver, kidney and thyroid as the target organs for the SCCP and MCCP mixtures tested in repeated dose toxicity studies. Decreased pup survival and subcutaneous haematoma/haemorrhage were also identified as critical effects for an MCCP mixture. For the LCCP mixtures tested, the liver was identified as the target organ. The Panel selected as reference points a BMDL10 of 2.3 mg/kg bw per day for increased incidence of nephritis in male rats, and of 36 mg/kg bw per day for increased relative kidney weights in male and female rats for SCCPs and MCCPs, respectively. For LCCPs, a reference point relevant for humans could not be identified. Due to the limitations in the toxicokinetic and toxicological database, the Panel concluded that derivation of a health‐based guidance value was not appropriate. Only limited data on the occurrence of SCCPs and MCCPs in some fish species were submitted to EFSA. No data were submitted for LCCPs. Thus, a robust exposure assessment and consequently a complete risk characterisation could not be performed. A preliminary risk characterisation based only on the consumption of fish was performed, and the calculated margins of exposure suggested no health concern for this limited scenario. The Panel noted that dietary exposure will be higher due to the contribution of CPs from other foods. The Panel was not able to identify reference points for farm animals, horses and companion animals. No occurrence data for feed were submitted to EFSA. Therefore, no risk characterisation could be performed for any of these animal species.

This publication is linked to the following EFSA Supporting Publications article: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.2903/sp.efsa.2020.EN-1815/full


© European Food Safety Authority, 2015

Risk assessment of chlorinated paraffins in feed and food


Published on: 9 March 2020

The Panel received a mandate from the European Commission to assess the genotoxic potential of triazine amine based on available information submitted by the applicants. Available information includes experimental genotoxicity data on triazine amine, Quantitative Structure–Activity Relationship (QSAR) analysis and read across with structurally similar compounds. Based on the overall weight of evidence, the Panel, in agreement with the cross‐cutting Working Group Genotoxicity, concluded that there is no concern for the potential of triazine amine to induce gene mutations and clastogenicity; however, the potential to induce aneugenicity was not adequately investigated. For a conclusion, an in vitro micronucleus assay performed with triazine amine would be needed.


© European Food Safety Authority, 2015

Scientific Opinion of the Scientific Panel on Plant Protection Products and their Residues (PPR Panel) on the genotoxic potential of triazine amine (metabolite common to several sulfonylurea active substances)